What I learned on the Highway of Death in Iraq

Today is the 23rd anniversary of the start of the First Persian Gulf War also known as Operation Desert Storm. I was a 29-year-old Captain in the First Infantry Division, “The Big Red One” at Ft. Riley in Kansas. Angela and I just celebrated our first wedding anniversary in December 1990 and now I was deploying into combat — something she had seen her own dad do twice to Vietnam.

I was the Fire Support Officer for Task Force 2-16 Infantry (call sign Ranger 14) in the 2nd Brigade (Dagger). Our mission was to be the lead task force of the 1st Infantry, which was the lead Division of the US VII Corps, into the breach to establish the cleared lanes for the follow-on elements to exploit and continue the attack to envelope Saddam’s Republican Guard units.

Was I nervous, yep, but this was what we had been trained to do — open desert warfare — and would be the culmination of all those National Training Center exercises.

My Artillery Battalion chose me to be the advance party Officer in Charge since I was a senior captain who had already commanded.

My responsibility was to land early and begin preparations for the arrival of the full battalion. I remember the SCUD missile alerts and the threats of frogmen saboteurs at the port. We quickly gathered our equipment, combat-loaded and deployed into the deep desert.

Finally, the day came. It was a foggy, rainy morning. Visibility was poor but we launched. There was a massive artillery preparation, cannon and multiple launch rocket systems (MLRS). it was impressive, our modern US military.

Our scout platoon radioed back “contact” and we went into our plan. Mortars engaged, and then so quickly, ceased fire because the enemy was surrendering. We had surprised the Iraqi forces by showing up so deep in the desert with such a massive force, and thanks to our plan of deception, even the media didn’t know the entire US VII Corps was where it was.

We quickly rolled up the frontline defenses, opened up breach lanes, and began our follow and support operations to ensure there would be no remnant forces attacking to our rear. We knew we had the momentum and with our powerful M1 Abrams tanks, M2 Bradleys, M109 SP Howitzers, MLRS, AH-64 Apaches, and A-10s close air support our force firepower was overwhelming.

The damage delivered to the retreating Iraqi Army was devastatingly clear on what would be known as the “Highway of Death.” The last two Republican Guard Divisions were in our sights when the “ceasefire, consolidate in place” order came.

Our brigade consolidated around the Safwan airfield area and was tasked to secure the site for the surrender negotiations.

That night, after the grand meeting, we sat at our Task Force command post under the glow of the burning oil fields, shared stories and pondered the future. We knew the mission was a resounding success, but strategically we had left the enemy still capable.

And therein lies the lesson. We knew we would have to return, as some did in rotations to Kuwait, and others to guard a “no-fly” zone. We knew the enemy would use its capability against those who had wished we deposed Saddam, and that persecution happened to the Shia and the Kurds.

And so it goes.

Carl von Clausewitz wrote that war is the imposition of one’s will upon another. History teaches us that war has one of three objectives: annihilation, assimilation, or attrition of your enemy. When you engage in limited war, you will have even more limited results and lasting residual effects.

Many of us who were captains and staff sergeants returned to Iraq 12 years later as lieutenant colonels and master sergeants. The other night Greta van Susteren asked me what would I do regarding the situation in Iraq and the return of al Qaida. I responded that we would have to return. Astonished she said, you would go back to Iraq?

What Greta and many others fail to understand is that when you do not define victory and do not defeat your enemy, you will have to return — especially against the enemy called Islamic totalitarianism.

When we commit our forces, it must be to win, and our civilian leadership must have the burning desire and passion in their hearts to set up our men and women to win.

It is a sad cycle of warfare when it is fought by politicians, and not warriors or statesmen. I am proud to have served in Desert Storm and Iraq, the third generation in our family to have served in combat. But as I watched newly promoted Major Bernard West last week, I wondered, what battlefield will he have to return to? Plato said it best, “Only the dead have seen the end of war.”

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106 Comments on "What I learned on the Highway of Death in Iraq"

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John O'Connell
Guest

Why can’t we have more like you?

John J. Hampton, Retired Army
Guest
John J. Hampton, Retired Army

John, because it’s not politically correct to strive for victory. LTC West is precisely the kind of professional we need on our side to defeat our enemies both foreign and domestic. It seems to me that right now our most dangerous enemy is the domestic one.

John O'Connell
Guest

Agree with you all the way.PC is the worst affliction,stifles free speech.people are so afraid of speaking out.
being by nature an optimist,I can only hope things wil come back to how they were.

Doug Jackson
Guest

Thank you ALL FOR YOUR SERVICE! The military was not very popular then so it took a lot to serve. I was an army dependent growing up at Schofield Barracks HI. I still remember vividly watching the 25 Infantry standing in formation right across the street from our quarters. They were all shipping out to Viet Nam.That war was not very popular but our troops were/are the best in the damn world.

Michael Sanders
Guest

Awesome sir, Glad to have served in the same battlefield as you, although I never new it until now. Diamonbacks HHB Commo 3/20th FA 109 SP

DavBow
Guest

Go for total win or don’t go!

Karen Harlow
Guest

The Democratic politicians STILL haven’t learned their lessons, even after Viet Nam. They all need to read Sun Tzu’s Art of War.

dginga
Guest

They have read Sun Tzu, but they think it only applies to battles with Republicans. In those battles they take no prisoners.

Dave Geary
Guest

Sir, I was there as well, sir! 2ND Armored Div Engineers assigned to 1ST Cav. Proud to have served with you!

bassetluv
Guest

17th Engineer Battalion?

Dave Geary
Guest

Yes and no… I was deployed as “filler” from Germany. I ended up assigned to the 17th detachment that was assigned to 1st cav. We wore 2nd AD patches. We were referred to as John Henry Engineers

Patrick Downs
Guest

Correct me if I am wrong, but the ground invasion began 24 Feb iirc, and the Iraqi retreat and Highway of Death attack was on 26 Feb. I was at the highway on 28 Feb, after arriving (with 1st MarDiv/Task Force Ripper) in Kuwait City on the 26th (as an embedded journalist). The AIR war began on this date, January 17 at 2:38 a.m. (local time) or January 16 at 6:38 p.m. EST due to an 8 hour time difference, with an U.S. Apache helicopter attack. U.S.-led Coalition warplanes attacked Baghdad, Kuwait, and other military targets in Iraq.

go4it
Guest

Colonel West, thank you for serving our nation! Your unwavering loyalty, patriotism and bravery on the field of battle gives me hope that the United States of America can arise once again to greatness!

Burly Bergeron
Guest

I think that this is reason we so called lost the Viet Nam war. We won every battle but the suits in Washington would not let us do what was necassary to win, which could have been easily accomplished.

Rodman1938
Guest

Regardless of where you work or where you serve, “be aware of the suits!”

sojorrn
Guest
I recall saying the exact same thing having lunch with some older gentlemen during a business audit! At the time I was basing my assessment on my Viet Nam experience. I thought how could we leave Hussein in power a step away from his demise? Of course everyone at the lunch table disagreed & said ” it was the RIGHT thing to do” I replied with; “based on what knowledge in history”? “We will have to go back & finish the job eventually!” IMHO civilian politicians should have input on whether to go to war but once it has begun… Read more »
gonzogasman
Guest

The POTUS, as our civilian leader, should make the decision as to when our nation should and must go to war, but once that decision is made, the execution of combat decisions should be left to the Secretary of Defense who must agree with the military commanders and inform the president of military campaigns so that the president and his staff can seek out opportunities to engage the enemy leadership for surrender or negotiations. Wars must be fought to be won. Unnecessary death and suffering happens when politicians micromanage, e.g., President Johnson during the Vietnam conflict.

sojorrn
Guest

The POTUS is allowed to ask, request, or sell Congress for a declaration to go to war & must be limited in that decision making process until Congress declares War! It appears we agree on after the decision is made by an act of Congress! Although Civilian leadership has failed this country miserably due to Ideology!

William Henry Bowen
Guest

AMEN sir!! As numerous real leaders have said in the past “The is NO substitute for victory”.

JerryJ26
Guest

Let’s face it, Democrats will fight a war until they lose it.

sailor
Guest

Or use it for political reasons…

Rodman1938
Guest

Good observation Jerry.

jwb7605
Guest

Absolutely accurate. I’m a Vietnam vet, and I told my Gunnery Sergeant son that I opposed returning or going anywhere again unless a couple things change.
He was surprised to hear that, and asked me “what things?”
I replied “Complete victory and rules of engagement. Those two things are why this stuff drags on so long and ensures defeat”.

Allen Ehrlich
Guest
BRO Soldier myself sir. 1ID 2BCT, 2nd Brigade Recon COLT PLT, Iraq 04-05 to be specific. Proud to know you were a fellow Fire Supporter. I watched it with my own eyes go from all out war to having our hands tied behind our back. Politics and media should have stayed out of the war and let us accomplish our mission without fear of court martial. It is war, war is ugly, nasty, horrible, and everlasting in those who survive it. We, the fighting few went knowingly that we may not return. We fought hard and long, constantly, everyday. This… Read more »
Jim
Guest

I was there, hadn’t realized you were in the Big Red One. I was in the 101st MI Battalion. I remeber that highway. I also remember when the cease-fire happened. Prior to that we had been briefed we would be going through Baghdad. We all were overjoyed, but thought we stopped too soon.

Terry D Gibbens
Guest

SO TRUE

Terry D Gibbens
Guest

ISG 1015 Ag Co Postal 101st AB Division Assault

Zack Wagner
Guest

I like your perspective here. It makes sense. As much as I hate war and detest the thought of putting my children in harms way… You don’t go to war with a few missiles, a few tanks… get a white flag and bail… You have to crush your enemies, crush their spirit, and rebuild them.. Look at Japan… look at Germany… Loot at Italy… Strong vibrant America friendly (Mostly) countries…

Peace has to be brokered through strength… not backing out before the crushing blow.

spatin
Guest

OK on your comment except that I see no need to rebuild our enemies country and infrastructure. That’s their job. After we have spent our blood and our fortune to tear down the enemy, we should not spend more of our blood and our fortune to rebuild them so they can attack us again.

D S Dunlap
Guest

History shows that to be so. Also, victory should be so crushing that future opponents hesitate before seeking to engage you (See Soviet Union 1945-1991) in war.

Gregory Bell
Guest
We have not won a war decisively since WWll. And a tough call was made by President Truman. Drop the bomb, twice. I have NO malice towards the Japanese nor the Germans. My dad was a Captain in the Army, in the South Pacific during WWll. But the TOUGH call was made. The way the Korean war, Vietnam and now Iraq and Afghanistan have been conducted leaves me shaking my head. I believe that civilians and politically motivated military leaders are more concerned for their OWN welfare than actually winning a war. War IS HELL. No one wants it. But… Read more »
Vindic8
Guest

I was there with you sir. B Co 2/16.

Thank you for all that you do. The rare few like you keep hope alive for me.

Jkc
Guest

Your are so right MR WEST I said the same thing when I was in navy 69—-72 thank you for service.i tried to reenlist in opdesert storm I was told to stand down

A patriot
Guest

I was sent to Germany instead of the desert in 91 but I was stationed at Ft. Riley afterwards. HHC 541st Maintenance Battalion. I still word the Big Red One patch and I agree wholeheartedly with you sir on this post and all your others. We need you in the White House. We need men and women like you running our Republic. God bless America HUAH!!

Marc Rainer
Guest
Until the politicians recognize the difference between criminal enforcement (“police actions”) and warfare, and stop confusing the public by mixing up the two, we’ll still have “police actions” like Korea and ‘Nam, and “wars on drugs.” We’ll never win a “war on crime,” because it’s not a war, and we’ll never win an actual war if we talk about bringing enemies “to justice,” and serving as the “world’s policeman.” Crime will always be with us, but we can win wars, when our national interests are truly at stake, by formally declaring them and pursuing them in an unlimited fashion, with… Read more »
sailor
Guest

Bagdad should have been bombed in to rubble!

DezRAT
Guest

Thank you all for your service…..I was assigned to E Trp 2/3 ACR during Desert Storm….

MI Guy
Guest

Thank you Sir…I wasn’t too far away…. 3d ACR

James
Guest

Well said! D-1/35 AR. 2nd “Iron” BDE, 1st AD.

Cub
Guest

More people need to understand this. Hooah! MSG SC, USA(Ret.)

jabwocky
Guest

VERY well written, and to the point, I agree, and like you said, I said the same thing, when politicians get involved, like most everything else, they fail….

disqus_xp4GYx7DZk
Guest

“We will have to return”….what bullsh*t. NEVER should have been there in the first place…Saddam’s Iraq was NOT “Islamic totalitarianism”, whatever the fk THAT is supposed to mean….

Robert
Guest
I was in Kuwait when Iraq invaded. I served in CJTF/ME out of Bahrain. I assure you that it wasn’t about religion for either side. I will point you to the fact that Kuwait was the only official ally in the region requesting US assistance in defense of its country as far back as 1985. Earnest Will Missions was a direct example of our answering their request. If you can give me a reasonable position on why you think Iraq was not going to invade Kuwait again, I would be willing to listen. But if you are merely going to… Read more »
disqus_xp4GYx7DZk
Guest

I said NOTHING about “WMDs” That was all bullshit anyway, spewed by what’s his face at the UN…You are ALSO missing my larger point: playing policeman of the world has BANKRUPTED us and killed thousands of fine service people needlessly. WHY you CAN’T wrap your brain stem around THAT is beyond ME, but whatever….

Robert
Guest
This world police aspect does not address this specific war. The reality of every country in the world is a need for allies. If your ally is in need of defending like Kuwait was, how do you not answer that call and hope to retain any ally there after who is anything but a single sided partnership? What you create in not answering to your allies request for help in such a situation is to not have any allies at all. For the ones you retain are not actual allies but just showmanship. Soon the other nations will test yours… Read more »
virginiagentleman1
Guest
Hello xp4. Quite frankly, I enjoyed reading your reply to me which for a reason that I can’t fathom, is in moderation. Sometimes the Disqus powers that be suffer from a bad case of censorship I guess. Anyway, THANK YOU for your service. I have children and a couple of grandsons who are presently serving in the USAF. A foster son serves as a Delta Force operator. For generations members of my family have proudly worn the uniforms of our Armed Forces. As for my reference to Bush 41 and the NWO, as I remember, he was the first president… Read more »
disqus_xp4GYx7DZk
Guest
LOL! I OWE you a g.d. (sorry) drink….clearly, we have already “started anew”…you’re not gonna believe this, but when I first read your posts, I went off because being SO nearsighted, I just saw “Virginia” and thought, “Another g.d. (sorry), biddy, trying to tell ME, a MAN, what to do and think, as usual” LOL! THAT’S WHAT I get for having a Puerto Rican GF LOLOLOOLOLOL). I owe YOU a drink AND an apology. ANOTHER reason I tend to come out with arms swingin’ is because I am freakin’ LIVID about the RAMPANT T R E A S O N… Read more »
virginiagentleman1
Guest
Thanks for the reply, Jonathan. I’m kinda partial to that name as it also belongs to my number two son! No apologies are needed. I went off on you, before you returned fire, justifiably I might add. I am ten years older then you are, but it seems that we share similar views about the future of our children and grandchildren and our nation. I was blessed to have 6 kids, 2 boy’s and 4 girls. One of my sons, my oldest, rests in the arms of God for eternity. I have 19 grandchildren and often need a roster to… Read more »
Caribou "PAYCUT" Barbie™
Guest
Caribou "PAYCUT" Barbie™

What happened to number one son?

thegreatamerican
Guest

Are you that big a dapshat you don’t know Saddam ‘s Iraq invaded Kuwait and was threatening Saudi Arabia?

virginiagentleman1
Guest

What’s the matter, lefty? Your liberal yellow stripe showing down your back?
You make a blanket statement, but unlike West, you offer no logical REASON for the vomit you spew. West gave examples to back his statements. What are YOU offering to back yours besides vitriol?

disqus_xp4GYx7DZk
Guest

Oh, Virginia, SO BIG and BRAVE with OTHER peoples’ lives, are we?? First of all, I am a LIBERTARIAN who voted for Reagan TWICE, so your “lefty” DOESN’T apply, NICE try dipsh*t….2nd, did YOU or the so-called ‘greatamerican’ up there WEAR a service uniform?? Hmmm? I did. So, GFYs…..NWO suckers all

virginiagentleman1
Guest

I take it that you don’t read very well? In my opening reply near the top of the thread, I stated that I was a Navy Commando/diver, and served in VietNam in combat.
What have YOU done? What branch of service? Did you see combat? Did you serve your full term or did you wash out?

NWO? Please, that is soooo Bush41 of you.
Again I say to you, back up your charges with a logical explanation, and not spew vitriol in it’s stead.
If you can do that, we just might have a conversation.

Erwin Padgett
Guest

Need more fellow Americans like you, SIR, Herman Cain and David Webb, Also Ted Cruz. ALL THE WAY SIR, USAIMA, Ft. Bragg, NC.

mytincup
Guest

He is right. We new at the moment of cease fire that we would be going back at some time. If politicians aren’t willing to let us finish the job they should never send us.

virginiagentleman1
Guest
OUTSTANDING ANALYSIS, Colonel West! And judging by the replies of the numerous active and former warriors below, your analysis is shared by them as well! Whatever future battlefield awaits Major Bernard West, his chances of surviving it are much greater if YOU are in the White House as President or Vice President. Let’s be honest here, America NEEDS an experienced battlefield warrior as commander in the presidency or vice presidency. The mistakes made by past administrations going back to Bush 41 have caused the deaths of far too many of our warfighters. Isn’t it curious that with America having the… Read more »
Edwin Hutchins
Guest

No mission too difficult, No sacrifice too great, Duty First Sir.

oldslori
Guest
I’ll never forget 1991, I was 20 years old and I lost a friend of mine to war for the first time. He died on February 25, 1991. He was member of the 14th Quartermaster Detachment. Most people forget about those who die in combat but, it was hard to do that when 28 people were killed and 99 were wounded in one attack. Out of that, 13 were killed and 43 were injured just from the Pittsburgh Pennsylvania area alone and one of them was my friend, he was a 20 year old just like me and it really… Read more »
pickle
Guest

Our unit just left kopar towers when the attack happened. My heart goes out to you and the soliders there

tekteam26
Guest

I was actually in Khobar Towers at the time of the SCUD attack on the airfield. Since then, I have been a veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan. Now, I’m only a few days away from retiring from the Reserves. If we choose to fight a war, we must fight to utterly defeat our enemies. The Romans put it best; “If they do not respect us, then at least they must fear us.” The Islamists do not respect or fear us right now unfortunately.

Sandra Johnson
Guest

I will never forget early on looking up names of soldiers killed. It was around 253. I read the names, the ages and their rank. I was astonished how many were so terribly young, 18-25. Even surprising their commanding officers,45 years old, was just heartbreaking knowing they probably had families depending on them. My son served, rolling in the tanks in his many wheeled truck. He came home with PTSD and 36 medical issues. I never forget. Many patriots never forget.

gemalo
Guest

I was there as a civilian supporting the 4411th Joint STARS squadron. Our surveillance radar was responsible for finding the convoys on that Highway of Death. It was an experience I’ll never forget. I am proud to have been a part of it.

fromthemomma
Guest

I’m tired of tapping the enemy on the wrist, I’ve never served but knew we’d have to go back. Either finish the enemy or stay home.

@TwoStoneTim
Guest

Wow, I didn’t know we kicked the same sand, I was wrenching on A 4/5FA 1st ID 109 s, we crossed the Highway (hot) then sat perimeter around talks in Safwan
“Faithful and True”

Matthew Sizemore
Guest

Thank all of you for your service and protecting us. We should never take our freedoms for granted and cherish every moment and remember all of you who are willing to fight, have fought, have been injured or killed to keep us safe and America strong. May God bless you.

US_Patriot1776
Guest

West,…Palin,…Cruz…
I’ll accept at least ONE of the 3 in the White house in 2016 !!

falling321
Guest

i’ll accept one of them, but West and Palin together would be even better!

lewwaters
Guest

Early on in the war on terror, when Democrats were speaking often of an “exit strategy,” I said then the only acceptable “exit strategy” was a Victory.

Sadly, Dems won out and seemingly have tossed the word “Victory” out of their lexicons.

We no longer seem to fight wars to win. As a Vietnam Veteran, I am having trouble understanding why we engage in war at all any more if all we are to do is turn our backs on our allies and hand our enemies the “Victory.”

RaoulSF
Guest

Why are we fighting the wars we choose to fight? That might make a better topic. As a former soldier I believe in fighting for victory – why else bother. But if you’re going to ask American citizens to lay down their lives, it had better be worthwhile. Unfortunately Iraq didn’t, and arguably still doesn’t fit that bill. Afghanistan at one point did, but no longer. We need to ask more of our elected representatives than “Victory” slogans or mentality.

Robert
Guest

So your position is to not defend allies? Least we forget that the conflict with Iraq is first and foremost about the Iraqi invasion and slaughter of our ally Kuwait. There is nothing you can point to to suggest that would not have been the case again if we had not invaded Iraq the second time.

johnknee5
Guest

We should not go into battle to win a fight but to destroy our enemies will to fight. If we hesitate to political and media intervention we give aid to the enemy to re-coup and wait for the easing of pressure. WE never took away the historic lessions of Korea and Vietnam and have sacrificed our brave warriors to acts of terrorism.

Melissa
Guest

Eloquently spoken, Mr. West.

Reklaw Yelsew
Guest

As a veteran of both the Iraq and Afghan wars, it’s disheartening to see another “leader” who thinks that every problem can be solved with a military solution. We didn’t lose Iraq because we didn’t send enough American men and woman off to their deaths or kill enough Iraqis..

Donn M Searle
Guest
Walker, history will be the judge as to whether the second Iraq war was necessary. “Desert Storm” was; Saddam Hussein had been repeatedly warned and a neighboring country had been invaded. In the second, U.N. warnings against sanctions violations were ignored and the world’s intelligence agencies were convinced Iraq was again on a path toward achieving nuclear capability. Could the violations have been stopped short of invasion and occupation? I’m not sure, but it seems doubtful. Would Iraqis ever have managed to overcome their ancient tribal hatred, Sunni against Shiite -and become as one nation? Doubtful. But this is certain:… Read more »
Reklaw Yelsew
Guest
IMO, desert storm had much more to do with the threat Hussein Presented Saudi Arabia then with his invasion of kuwait. That was a regional conflict with one corrupt authoritarian government(that we had backed for the previous decade while they were gassing the iranians) attacking another. The only reason we cared was because of the potential effect on the oil market and the US government’s desire to project US power in the ME through Saudi Arabia. Fast forward to 2003, and we remove the only secular government in the region and replace it with another corrupt brutal government and turn… Read more »
Greg D
Guest

Cruz and West on one ticket. Methinks West would make great VP for 4 or 8 years and then President.

jacheff
Guest

West & Cruz is more like it. A commander in chief should serve first.

gbry
Guest

Either way, would be wonderful!

Justsomeguy
Guest
I was a young Air National Guard Staff Sergeant and was largely in the rear with the gear. From my perspective, once we had closed the highway, our continuing to shoot it up gave a picture not of victory but of a turkey shoot against what were in the end unarmored and lightly armed people in full retreat. That image was one that was seen by all and caused the ceasefire that allowed the republican guard to escape with their lives and heavy armor. We had the opportunity to defeat that them in totality. The failure to do that led… Read more »
RaoulSF
Guest
Absolutely agree, it’s the Powell Doctrine essentially – if we commit US forces understand the mission, have an exit strategy, and ensure we have overwhelming forces. Nice to have when you’ve got them. Issue as I see it is more to the tune of – are we fighting the right wars? Are they wars the American people support? Do they have a political objective that is in keeping with our heritage and values as a nation? Do we have the intestinal fortitude to see it through? And lastly, can we afford them – politically, socially, and economically. Neither the Iraqi… Read more »
Robert
Guest
Your premise is flawed, nor does it address the failures. It is not capital or military might that was limiting, it was not a country that could not be beaten that was limiting. It was the political process and its failures that limited the possibility of victory. You state in short that Iraq was a charade and saber rattling. That fails to look at the reasoning for action from the military and diplomatic views, and only sees it as the politicians laid out the reasoning for war. They are not one in the same, and if the politicians had stuck… Read more »
Virginia Llorca
Guest

Fortune in scrap sitting there. Anybody bidding on that contract?

Robert
Guest

it has a higher radiation level than Chernobyl, you can’t work in that area without heavy protection for any length of time and even then you’re gambling with the odds. The iron and steel will rust away long before the radiation levels are low enough to disregard. It is the reason depleted uranium rounds are no longer widely used. Lessons learned.

Virginia Llorca
Guest

I never heard about radiation. Could you send me a link? Or. Would wikipedia or google be helpful? Not that I doubt. I get teased when I talk about the rusting barrels of yellow cake.

Dale Cordell
Guest

Probably why so many Storm vets came home, got sick and died. I lost a good friend who was over there. The “agent orange” of Desert Storm … radiation sickness or some danged thing that nobody’s even tried to figure out.

Robert
Guest
There has been a lot of studies on this. I am one who is effected by what I was exposed to there. Having said that, there seems to be multiple causes and depending on where and when a person was exposed to each cause is reflective to their symptoms which unfortunately were lumped all together under the term “Desert Storm Syndrome” by the VA. The VA is happy to detail some of the causes but still shows a desire to deny or not consider others that have been found by independent research into the issue. Everything from Uranium depleted rounds,… Read more »
John
Guest

I was a soldier at Ft Riley in the now decommissioned 5th Bn/16th Inf, 84-87. Served in Desert Storm while in the Navy, though. Small world.

john pogozelski
Guest

Most Affirm Sir. TOTAL defeat is necessary with overwhelming force to the get the job done, as soldiers ARE SUPPOSED to be allowed to do. Afterward, if they try to rise up again you go even harder at them immediately & without mercy !

Tonethousand
Guest
I remember returning to Camp Pendleton, in April, 1991 and sitting in the Bn. class room and finally having all the SNCO’s and Officers in the unit in one place to be addressed by the Bn.Commander. As we sat there and chatted with comrades we might not have seen since deploying the prior August, there was no bravado or back-slapping. As a matter of fact the mood was one of unrequited satisfaction, a foreboding that we didn’t finish the job. Finally one Master Sergeant said it: “Well we almost all came back alive, but why am I afraid that ten… Read more »
ew_3
Guest

Sadly I heard Patricia Schroeder (D-CO) make claims in the House that she did not see any military vehicles on this road. (Total BS, but our congressmen and senators do not need to honest on the floor, unlike we do)
Ms Schroeder went on to be head of the association of textbook publication companies and made the wonderful comment about “accuracy is not a requirement” or something to that effect.

PaulR
Guest

Pat Schroeder was the Nancy Pelosi of her day – a [email protected], leftist, half-brained twit who would lie for any advantage.

Mark Rowan
Guest
Vietnam was no different than you describe in this quote, “When we commit our forces it must be to win, and our civilian leadership must have the burning desire and passion in their hearts to set up our men and women to win”. Thank you Allen West for an excellent article, and all that you do and have done for this country, from one veteran to another! commit our forces, it must be to win, and our civilian leadership must have the burning desire and passion in their hearts to set up our men and women to win. Read more… Read more »
doc540
Guest

Colonel John Boyd